it may just help

B.

If you have not read my previous post then this post may not make much sense. So before you read this, go here and read this one first.

In my last post I wrote about lower back pain and what newer research is concluding regarding what may be causing it. As promised, this is the follow up post and I want to use this post to go over what you can do if you are suffering from lower back pain caused by stress on your thoracolumbar fascia.

What

Let’s look at the 3 common items I covered last post that can distress the thoracolumbar fascia and cause back pain and what can be done to address them:

  • Dehydration: Simple. Drink more water and also consume foods that are high in water content. If your urine is dark in colour, not light like straw you are dehydrated. Check out this link to read up on the colour of your pee. If you are very active or sweat a lot, you have to consume more water. And if you can, please stay away from bottled water. The huge negative impact on our environment and also to yourself for something that is in the ground under your feet, comes out of your taps and is pretty much available anywhere for free. If you are concerned about the safety of your water you can purchase water filtering kits for your home or elsewhere. It doesn’t make sense environmentally and economically for you to purchase water pulled from the ground, transported, put into plastic (a byproduct of oil) bottles, transported again to the store for you to pay for. If you would like more info on the environmental and health impacts of bottled water check out the links.
  • Lifting: “Lift with your legs, not your back otherwise you could injure your thoracolumbar fascia!” That’s it. Lift properly. Not only heavy things but all things. Lifting something incorrectly that’s not that heavy may not cause discomfort but it may cause distress and over time, doing the same thing, that distress can add up and lead to an injury that requires time off of work, time away from the fun things you like doing. When lifting, don’t bend over at the waist. Bend your legs, look forward or even up, keep you back straight, weight on the heels and lift using the muscles in your legs. If you feel the load is too much for you, get someone else to lift it!
  • Sitting: When at work, be sure to get yourself a desk that can go from a normal sitting position to standing position. If you think about it, why do we sit in chairs at work? How long have people been doing this? For years! Way back when offices were created, long before computers, we lived in different times. The boss, the company held all the power (ok, that hasn’t changed all that much over the years). No sick days, no going home because your back is sore. Also, that work did not involve having your hands out in front of you using a computer. So why do we still use technology today that is from over a hundred years ago? It makes no sense! We know the more we sit the worse it is for us. And for as little as a couple of hundred dollars you can get a device that will allow you to stand and sit while using a computer. Keep this in mind too, the damage isn’t only done over a long time frame, short term consequences can have long term impacts too. Short term is a relative term but it can be as long as 5 years. If you work for 45 years 5 years is about only 11% of that time frame. And don’t let the boss make you feel like a snowflake asking for this. It’s 2019 for f*cks sake! Our workspaces shouldn’t look like they did back in 1919. If you need to, put together your arguments on why this will benefit your boss. At the end of the day when you are gone working somewhere else for whatever reason, you will still have the back you have while your boss will not really give two sh*ts.

Lastly

Hot baths, hot water bottle, heating pad are great for bringing heat and thus increasing blood flow to the injured area which should aid in healing. You can also try this stretching routine to help loosen things up:

      • Lying on the floor on your back with knees bent, feet flat on the ground, take time to feel the spots that have tension and relax them. Lay on the floor and feel everything relax.
      • Then, press your lower back to the floor (cat pose) and relax. Then, do it again for 8 to 10 times.
      • Now, do the reverse. Bring your lower back up (cow pose) to increase the space between your lower back and the floor. Do this about 8 to 10 times.
      • Lay there and relax.
      • Do the above again, the cat and the cow.

The above can also be done while sitting in a chair. Try it!

Finally

Take care of yourself. Advocate for yourself. You are your keeper.

Yours in health,

Darryl

Author: darryl bennett

A certified Canfitpro personal trainer specialist, and a Yondan (4th Degree) black belt in Shorin Ryu Shorin Kan karate, training at Ferraro Karate under Sensei Stephen Ferraro. Also holding a certificate in Plant Based Nutrition from ECornell University. Fitness and health have been a big part of my life, and always will be.

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